Table Grace — 1 Timothy 4:1-5

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Levi Durfey 

 

Thanksgiving is here again. It’s time for families to gather together and for lots of food to be consumed. Of course, this is a time of year that turkeys tremble in fear. Nearly 90% of Americans eat turkey on Thanksgiving—almost 50 million turkeys are eaten on that day (and for the next week as turkey sandwiches).

 

You may not know this, but every year Butterball opens a turkey talk hotline that people can call and get help cooking their Thanksgiving turkey (1-800-BUTTERBALL). 

 

You can imagine the sorts of calls that they get. Here’s a few examples (from various places on the Internet):

 

  • A disappointed woman called wondering why her turkey had no breast meat. After a conversation with a Talk-Line operator, it became apparent that the woman’s turkey was lying on the table upside down.
  • A man called saying that he had a turkey from 1969 that he found in his Dad’s freezer—it was 30 years old and he wondered if he could cook it.
  • Another man called saying that he had cut his turkey in half with a chain saw—would the chain oil affect the taste in any way?
  • One distraught woman called because her pet Chihuahua had crawled into the turkey and gotten stuck in the body cavity.

 

Well, somehow the turkey gets cooked and families gather around the table to eat. Continue reading

The Dispensations of Grace And Millennium

Topic: Dispensationalism

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Levi Durfey 

 

In the last lesson, we continued a look at Dispensationalism, and specifically, the seven dispensations found in the Bible. If you missed the last two lessons, the notes are on the Internet at the Montana Pastor website.

 

Dispensationalism is a way of reading and interpreting the Bible. It has two main identifying characteristics:

 

(1) Dispensationalists consistently read the Bible literally. Yes, there are figures of speech in the Bible. Jesus is not a literal piece of bread when He says that he is the Bread of Life. But as often as we can, we read the Bible literally. And because we do…

 

(2) Dispensationalists view Israel and the Church as distinct. The Church has not replaced Israel. God has stopped working with Israel for now, but He will, after the Rapture of the Church start working with Israel again.

 

Why is it called Dispensationalism? Because it focuses on the dispensations in the Bible. 

 

What is a dispensation? A dispensation is a period of time wherein God manages the world in a certain way. Most Dispensationalists see seven dispensations in the Bible.

 

For each of the seven dispensations, we’ll look at seven parts—the name, the key person, the responsibility of man, the test of man, the failure of man, the judgment on man, and then God’s Display Of Grace.

Continue reading

The Dispensations of Promise and Law

Topic: Dispensationalism

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Levi Durfey 

 

In the last lesson, we started a look at Dispensationalism, and specifically, the seven dispensations found in the Bible. We covered the first three: Innocence, Conscience, and Civil Government. If you missed the last lesson, you can find the notes on the Internet at the Montana Pastor website.

 

Dispensationalism is a way of reading and interpreting the Bible. It has two main identifying characteristics:

 

(1) Dispensationalists consistently read the Bible literally. Yes, there are figures of speech in the Bible. Jesus is not a literal piece of bread when He says that he is the Bread of Life. But as often as we can, we read the Bible literally. And because we do…

 

(2) Dispensationalists view Israel and the Church as distinct. The Church has not replaced Israel. God has stopped working with Israel for now, but He will, after the Rapture of the Church start working with Israel again.

 

Why is it called Dispensationalism? A dispensation is a period of time wherein God manages the world in a certain way. Most Dispensationalists see seven dispensations in the Bible:

 

(1) Innocence

(2) Conscience

(3) Civil Government

(4) Promise

(5) Law

(6) Grace

(7) Millennium

 

For each of the seven dispensations, we’ll look at seven parts—the name, the key person, the responsibility of man, the test of man, the failure of man, the judgment on man, and then God’s Display Of Grace.

Continue reading