Table Grace — 1 Timothy 4:1-5

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Levi Durfey 

 

Thanksgiving is here again. It’s time for families to gather together and for lots of food to be consumed. Of course, this is a time of year that turkeys tremble in fear. Nearly 90% of Americans eat turkey on Thanksgiving—almost 50 million turkeys are eaten on that day (and for the next week as turkey sandwiches).

 

You may not know this, but every year Butterball opens a turkey talk hotline that people can call and get help cooking their Thanksgiving turkey (1-800-BUTTERBALL). 

 

You can imagine the sorts of calls that they get. Here’s a few examples (from various places on the Internet):

 

  • A disappointed woman called wondering why her turkey had no breast meat. After a conversation with a Talk-Line operator, it became apparent that the woman’s turkey was lying on the table upside down.
  • A man called saying that he had a turkey from 1969 that he found in his Dad’s freezer—it was 30 years old and he wondered if he could cook it.
  • Another man called saying that he had cut his turkey in half with a chain saw—would the chain oil affect the taste in any way?
  • One distraught woman called because her pet Chihuahua had crawled into the turkey and gotten stuck in the body cavity.

 

Well, somehow the turkey gets cooked and families gather around the table to eat. Continue reading

Is Your Spiritual Growth Noticeable?—1 Timothy 4:15

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Levi Durfey

 

INTRODUCTION 

 

In the first letter to Timothy, Paul writes words of counsel:

 

12 Let no man despise thy youth; but be thou an example of the believers, in word, in conversation, in charity, in spirit, in faith, in purity. 13 Till I come, give attendance to reading, to exhortation, to doctrine. 14 Neglect not the gift that is in thee, which was given thee by prophecy, with the laying on of the hands of the presbytery. 15 Meditate upon these things; give thyself wholly to them; that thy profiting may appear to all. 16 Take heed unto thyself, and unto the doctrine; continue in them: for in doing this thou shalt both save thyself, and them that hear thee. (1 Timothy 4:12–16)

 

Right now, I want to focus us in on verse 15—

 

1 Timothy 4:15 Meditate upon these things; give thyself wholly to them; that thy profiting may appear to all. 

 

This is a challenge to all of us as Christians. Are we in God’s Word so much that other people will notice that we are growing? If not, why not? If we’re not, how do we get into God’s Word in a way that will help us grow?

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Sermon: The Commitments Of A Spiritual Leader

1 Timothy 4:6-16

 

6 If thou put the brethren in remembrance of these things, thou shalt be a good minister of Jesus Christ, nourished up in the words of faith and of good doctrine, whereunto thou hast attained. 7 But refuse profane and old wives’ fables, 

 

and exercise thyself rather unto godliness. 8 For bodily exercise profiteth little: but godliness is profitable unto all things, having promise of the life that now is, and of that which is to come. 9 This is a faithful saying and worthy of all acceptation. 

 

10 For therefore we both labour and suffer reproach, because we trust in the living God, who is the Saviour of all men, specially of those that believe. 

 

11 These things command and teach. 12 Let no man despise thy youth; but be thou an example of the believers, in word, in conversation, in charity, in spirit, in faith, in purity. 

 

13 Till I come, give attendance to reading, to exhortation, to doctrine. 

 

14 Neglect not the gift that is in thee, which was given thee by prophecy, with the laying on of the hands of the presbytery. 

 

15 Meditate upon these things; give thyself wholly to them; that thy profiting may appear to all. 16 Take heed unto thyself, and unto the doctrine; continue in them: for in doing this thou shalt both save thyself, and them that hear thee. (1 Timothy 4:6–16)

 

INTRODUCTION

 

At couple different times this summer, we’ve looked at the call of a spiritual leader, the character of a spiritual leader, and now, let’s look at the commitments of a spiritual leader. What is he or she committed to do?

 

Now, before I go on, when we think of a spiritual leader, we usually think of a pastor or someone in full-time ministry. Indeed, the passage that we’re looking at was written by Paul the apostle to a younger pastor named Timothy.

 

But the principles here can apply to everyone, because most Christians could be a spiritual leader in some arena of their lives.

 

A Christian in a secular workplace is a spiritual leader in that they need to be able to give the reason for the hope anyone who asks.

 

A mother is a spiritual leader to her children.

 

A father is a spiritual leader to his family.

 

Someone in a nursing home could be a spiritual leader to those around: fellow residents or the nurses and doctors who care for them.

 

So, don’t think that this doesn’t apply to you. There is likely at least one arena in your life, if not a few, where you can be a spiritual leader.


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Sermon: The Character Of A Spiritual Leader

1 Timothy 3:1-7

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1 This is a true saying, If a man desire the office of a bishop, he desireth a good work. 2 A bishop then must be blameless, the husband of one wife, vigilant, sober, of good behaviour, given to hospitality, apt to teach; 3 Not given to wine, no striker, not greedy of filthy lucre; but patient, not a brawler, not covetous; 4 One that ruleth well his own house, having his children in subjection with all gravity; 5 (For if a man know not how to rule his own house, how shall he take care of the church of God?) 6 Not a novice, lest being lifted up with pride he fall into the condemnation of the devil. 7 Moreover he must have a good report of them which are without; lest he fall into reproach and the snare of the devil. (1 Timothy 3:1–7)

 

INTRODUCTION: A NEED FOR SPIRITUAL LEADERS

 

On Father’s day, we discussed the need for fathers to be Spiritual Leaders in their families, churches, and communities. That was a Call for Spiritual Leaders.

 

But to be a spiritual leader, it requires more than just being called, it requires a person to have a certain kind character. The Bible has much to teach us about the Character of Spiritual Leaders. 

 

And it’s important that we get our idea of character from the Bible, because our culture today is twisting the idea of moral character on it’s head. 

 

Immoral things are called moral. Moral beliefs are called immoral, evil, and outdated. Those who do this should be warned:

 

20 Woe unto them that call evil good, and good evil; That put darkness for light, and light for darkness; That put bitter for sweet, and sweet for bitter! (Isaiah 5:20)

 

One glaring example of this in our time is the issue of same-sex marriage. If you read the news you will find the idea that same-sex marriage is moral, and to be against same-sex marriage is immoral.

 

Another is that abortion is moral because it protects the reproductive rights of women. 

 

The rush to bury the morals of the Bible and erect a human-centered society (a modern Tower of Babel) gains speed and ground with each passing year. 

 

Our culture needs spiritual leaders, leaders who are willing to stand for the principles and the morals that God has outlined for humanity in his Word.


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Sermon: Fathers–Flee, Follow, Fight

1 Timothy 6:11-12

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11 But thou, O man of God, flee these things; and follow after righteousness, godliness, faith, love, patience, meekness. 12 Fight the good fight of faith, lay hold on eternal life, whereunto thou art also called, and hast professed a good profession before many witnesses. (1 Timothy 6:11–12)

 

INTRODUCTION

 

First Timothy was written to a young pastor named Timothy. I have to wonder what he felt when he read the words in verse 11, “But thou, O man of God.” Did his mind flash back to Old Testament men of God like Moses and Elijah? Did he feel embarrassed or unworthy to be given a title like that of those famed men of old?

 

Why did the apostle Paul call Timothy a man of God? Certainly, it was in part because he exhibited godly characteristics. But was it also a challenge? A call to Timothy to take up the mantle of men like Moses and Elijah and be a man of God?

 

This Father’s Day what does this say to us? It says the same thing: it’s a challenge and a call to be men of God. 

 

I will speak most directly to fathers today, but every Christian should hear the call to be a man or woman of God. Every believer ought to pick up the responsibility and privilege of the title: “man of God.”

 

What does a man of God do? In these two verses we’ll see three activities of the man of God. Fleeing; Following After; and Fighting.


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